Book Fight!

Tough love for literature

Episode 120: C.S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe

3 Comments

Every once in a while, the Book Fight podcast will revisit some book that meant a lot to us as kids. This, dear listener, is one of those times. Well, sort of: one of us read and treasured this book, along with the other Narnia books, as a child. The other of us somehow missed the fact of this book’s existence, because maybe he grew up underground, raised by mole people? He’s denying it, though that’s exactly what a mole person would do.

The-Lion-the-Witch-and-the-Wardrobe

The one of us who did read The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe as a child was a bit nervous about revisiting it. What if it wasn’t as good as he remembered? What if the Christian stuff was super heavy-handed and annoying? What if he’d lost his capacity for childlike joy and wonder?

The other of us was mostly just curious. Who was this “Aslan” he’d heard so much about? And were there mole people in the book? He finds books with mole people to be very relatable. Not because he’s a mole person, mind you, or was raised by mole people, but because mole people are interesting, aren’t they? Their trials and tribulations and whatnot. Who wouldn’t want to read about people who live underground and are terrified of sunlight and are possibly the result of an American military experiment gone horribly awry?

Anyway, this isn’t a show about which of us is a mole person and which of us isn’t. This is a show about books, and literature. We hope you enjoy it! If you do, please visit us in the iTunes store, or wherever you get your podcasts, and subscribe (for free) so you never miss another episode. And tell your book-loving friends!

You can stream the episode below, or download the mp3 file. If you have thoughts about the things we talked about, don’t hesitate to send us an email, or just leave a comment here on the site. Thanks for listening!

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Download Episode 120 (right-click, save-as)

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Author: mikeingram25

writer, editor

3 thoughts on “Episode 120: C.S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe

  1. I can identify with your nervousness – I worshiped Carl Sagan’s Contact as a teenager and was thrilled beyond belief when the movie came out. I went back and reread it when I was about 35 or so and it wasn’t the book I remembered. Even got my husband to read it and neither of us can understand why it was my absolute favorite book back in the day. I guess that our points of view and beliefs change as we mature and that goes for books as well.

  2. You guys are killin’ me with this rereading of The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, but I do applaude your willingness to revisit a childhood favorite. Good times. You guys are having a really tough time eking through this allegory, but after running a CS Lewis book club for a couple years, I can help you with a couple items you may find interesting: during WWII, kids in the air raid areas in the city were temporarily sent to “volunteers” in the country. No relations in this instance. And the allegory is a piece of a larger picture of the biblical narrative – each book touching upon an important “concept” of Christianity, which is why it probably didn’t compute to you as a more direct allegory. It’s an allegory of the concept of Christ, not the actual biblical story – so don’t go too crazy trying to draw direct paralells to the bible. That’s the beauty of the Narnia books – Lewis was great at doing many things at once: allegory, children’s book, fodder for adult cynicism…but an excellent choice for something to reread as an adult & not find totally repulsive. Thanks for the discussion!

  3. Pingback: 2016: The Book Fight! Year in Review | Book Fight!

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