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Episode 307: Christmas 2019!

It’s that special time of year again, folks. When your beloved Book Fight hosts take a break from all the very serious literary talk and dive into a sometimes-cheesy, sometimes-infuriating, always-entertaining Christmas book. In past years we’ve read books by Debbie Macomber, Janet Evanovich, and even Glenn Beck. This year we’re checking out a book by the “queen of the beach read,” Elin Hilderbrand, who a few years ago branched out with a series of books set around the holidays.

For this episode, we read the first of Hilderbrand’s winter books, which introduced us to the Quinn family. Kelley Quinn owns an inn on Nantucket that he might have to sell. His second wife, Mitzi, has been carrying on an affair with the man who dresses up as Santa Claus at the inn’s annual holiday party. His oldest son, Patrick, might be headed to prison for insider trading. His daughter Ava is feeling lukewarm about her boyfriend, and his middle son Nathaniel is about to propose to a hot French lady. Oh, and his youngest son might be dead in Afghanistan.

We’ll be taking our usual end-of-year hiatus next week, BUT we’ll have a special bonus episode for our Patreon subscribers. We read a second, much more ridiculous holiday book, about knitting vampires, and we can’t wait to tell you all about it. To get that episode, and our other bonus content–including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, and episodes in our advice series, Reading the Room–all you have to do is chip in $5 a month, which helps support the show and keeps our regular episodes free.

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 306: Flash Fiction!

We’ve spent this fall season looking at some of the best stories to teach in creative writing workshops. It’s our last week, and we’re talking flash fiction. Definitions of flash vary, but generally speaking the term seems to apply to short stories of fewer than 1,000 words. We discuss our approaches toward teaching flash fiction generally, and then we dive into a few specific pieces: “What Happened to the Phillips?” by Tyrese Coleman; Jacob Guajardo’s “Good News Is Coming“; “When It’s Human and When It’s Dog” by Amy Hempel; and two short pieces by Joy Williams.

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 305: Multiple Points of View

This fall, we’ve been talking about the best stories to teach in a creative writing class. For this week’s competition, we’re discussing stories that are told from multiple points of view. It can be difficult enough to successfully capture a single character’s consciousness on the page, which makes our first story pick especially impressive: “The Casual Car Pool,” by Katherine Bell, which originally appeared in the fall 2005 issue of Ploughshares. Our second pick takes a different tack to exploring multiple characters, keeping a distanced, fly-on-the-wall perspective: J.D. Salinger’s “A Perfect Day for Bananafish.”

We talk about the ways we approach point of view when teaching creative writing classes, particularly when it comes to the varieties of third person narration. We also talk about the difficulty of writing from multiple points of view in a single story, and whether it’s something we’d encourage or discourage our students from trying.

Also this week: one last trip into the NaNoWriMo forums!

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 302: Ripped From the Headlines

This week we’re looking at two stories that take on current events–in one case, a story about refugees at the American-Mexico border, and in the other, a story about a white college student who gets called out after posting a picture of herself in a Confederate-flag bikini. We talk about the benefits, and potential drawbacks, of teaching stories about current political controversies in a creative writing class, and how we might approach those stories with our students. Also: in a landscape crowded with really compelling narrative nonfiction, what can fiction, specifically, add to the political discourse?

The stories this week are Danielle Evans’s “Boys Go To Jupiter” (you can read it in The Sewanee Review with a subscription; it’s also in the most recent Best American Short Stories anthology) and Cristina Henriquez’s “Everything is Far From Here” (you can read that one in The New Yorker).


As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 301: Stories That Do Interesting Things With Time

This week, we’re on the hunt for stories that do interesting things with time. More specifically, we talk about how “time” can be a useful angle into talking about story structure in a creative writing class. Our story picks are Stuart Dybek’s “Paper Lanterns” and Raymond Carver’s “Are These Actual Miles?” (or, “What Is It,” depending on what version of the story you’ve got). Also: it’s November, which means it’s National Novel Writing Month, which means it’s time for us to visit the NaNoWriMo forums!

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 300: Quest Stories

This week, you might say that we’re on a quest to find the best quest story to teach in a creative writing class. For years, both of us have taught Sherman Alexie’s “What You Pawn I Will Redeem,” but for a variety of reasons–including accusations of sexual harassment against the author–we’re looking for something new. Will it be Charles Yu’s story “Fable,” or Chris Offutt’s “Out of the Woods”?

Mike had read (and taught!) another Charles Yu story in the past, and this one was recommended by one of our listeners on Twitter. Tom, meanwhile, has periodically taught Offutt’s story of a man sent on a mission to pick up a body. Both Mike and Tom studied a little with Chris Offutt in grad school, too, and have long been admirers of his writing. So this week’s contest might be a tough one!

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 299: Setting

This week, we’re continuing our quest for the best stories to use in a creative writing course, with pieces where setting plays a strong role: Tony Earley’s “The Prophet From Jupiter” and “Roots” by Michael Crummey. We talk about how both authors evoke a strong sense of place through small details, and how to discuss that kind of world-building with creative writing students.

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 298: Breakup Stories

This week, we’re continuing our quest for the best stories to use in a creative writing course, with pieces about breakups: Courtney Bird, “Still Life, With Mummies” and “Cat Person” by Kristen Roupenian. You might remember the latter as “that story that went viral and briefly broke the internet,” spurring hot takes from a bunch of people who seemingly hadn’t read a short story in a very long time.

We talk about how students write about breakups, and what kinds of models these stories might provide for them. We also discuss strategies for discussing both of these stories in class, including how to approach some of the more uncomfortable sex writing in “Cat Person,” and how the online discourse around that story could be interesting–or frustrating–to get into with a creative writing class.

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 297: Magical Realist Stories

This week, we’re continuing our quest for the best stories to use in a creative writing course, with pieces that incorporate magical elements: “The Healer” by Aimee Bender versus a trio of very short stories by Etgar Keret.

We talk about what the term “magical realism” actually means, and how we introduce it in the classroom. We also discuss ways to open up a fiction class to a diversity of styles and genres while still assuring that students are challenging themselves and trying new things. Plus: Are magicians creeps? And Tom revisits the work of Jim Harrison, mostly out of spite.

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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Episode 296: Second Person Stories

This fall, we’re exploring the canon of creative writing, trying to find the best stories to teach in creative writing classes. Each week we’ll have a different theme, either a craft element or type of story, and we’ll each nominate a story we think works particularly well in the classroom. We’ll pit the stories against each other and by the end of the episode crown a winner.

This week we’ve got two second person stories: “How to Leave Hialeah,” by Jennine Capo Crucet, going up against Lorrie Moore’s “How to Be an Other Woman.”

We talk about the internet logic of the second person, and the closeness it creates between narrator and reader. We also discuss our approaches to teaching second person, especially for students who might initially be put off by it. Also, there’s some cat talk that has nothing whatsoever to do with writing or teaching. But people like cats, right?

As always, you can stream the show right here on our site, or download the mp3 file to listen to later. Or check us out in Apple podcasts, where you can subscribe (for free!) and catch up on older episodes. We’re also available on Spotify, Stitcher, or just about any other podcast app. If for some reason you can’t find us in your favorite app, please reach out and let us know!

If you like the show and would like more Book Fight in your life, consider subscribing to our Patreon. For $5/month, you’ll get access to regular bonus episodes, including monthly episodes of Book Fight After Dark, where we read some of the world’s weirdest–and steamiest!–novels. We’ve also recently begun a new series of Patreon-only mini-episodes called Reading the Room, in which we offer advice on how to navigate awkward, writing-related social situations.

Thanks for listening!

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