Book Fight!

Tough love for literature


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Where to start

Hello, new friends and/or future enemies: thanks to this post at The Millions, we’ve been getting lots of traffic today from people presumably trying to figure out what our whole deal is. It can be pretty daunting to figure out where to start any new podcast, but especially one that has a 4 year backlog of weekly episodes (understandably, the author of the post at The Millions was a little thrown by our… unorthodox… episode numbering system, and though that post says we have 130 episodes, we have something closer to 250).

So, if you’re new here and trying to figure out where to begin, some suggestions:

1) Our 2015 Year in Review post will point you to a lot of the highlights

2) This post from April 2015 was my previous attempt to help people find an entry point

3) This very generous review by Marie Manthe names some of her favorite all-time episodes

4) My favorite episodes from this year, which for obvious reasons aren’t included in the 2015 recap:

5) UPDATED 1/3/17: We recently posted our 2016 highlights, in case you’re looking for even more suggestions.

People love different things about this show, so your favorites might differ from mine. But hopefully this helps you get started.

 

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Episode 208: 2017 Christmas Spectacular

It’s that time of year again, Book Fight family: time to throw a couple logs on the fire, pour yourself some eggnog, and listen to us make our way through another terrible Christmas-themed book. This time it’s from the Thomas Kinkade collection. Did you know that the Painter of Light was also the Writer of Light? Or, more likely, that the Painter of Light had enough money lying around that he could pay some poor writer to bring his cheesy paintings to life?

Honestly, some paintings were just made to be commemorative plates.

The specific Kinkade book we read was the fifth novel in “his” Cape Light series, called A Christmas Promise. It basically follows the plot of the Michael J. Fox movie Doc Hollywood, but … more Christian.

As always, you can stream the episode right here on our site, or download the mp3 file. You can also find us in the iTunes store, or in just about any app you might use to listen to podcasts.

If you like the show, please consider subscribing to our Patreon, which helps offset our costs and allows us to keep doing the podcast each week. In exchange for $5, you’ll also get access to a monthly bonus episode, Book Fight After Dark, in which we discuss the wide world of romance novels.

Stream Episode 208:

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Episode 207: John Cheever, “Christmas is a Sad Season for the Poor”

Hey, here’s another holiday-themed episode. We discuss a John Cheever story, “Christmas is a Sad Season for the Poor.” You can read it online, via The New Yorker, if you’re into that kind of thing. Or just listen to us yammer for an hour. That’s fun, too! We talk about all kinds of stuff. After listening to this week’s episode, you may not be any smarter, but you will definitely be one hour older.

Merry Christmas!

As always, you can stream the episode right here on our site, or download the mp3 file. You can also find us in the iTunes store, or in just about any app you might use to listen to podcasts.

If you like the show, please consider subscribing to our Patreon, which helps offset our costs and allows us to keep doing the podcast each week. In exchange for $5, you’ll also get access to a monthly bonus episode, Book Fight After Dark, in which we discuss the wide world of romance novels.

Stream Episode 207:

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Episode 206: Peter Straub, Ghost Story

You may be asking yourself how this week’s pick is a “holiday book,” exactly. Fair question! But one which Mike explains, more or less, in the episode. It’s also one of our only forays, thus far, into the horror genre, and we talk a little about what makes a horror book scary, plus what separates real psychological horror, as opposed to the sort of blood and gore that can almost read like slaptstick. Stephen King has said that this book is one of the best horror books of the late 20th century, which is pretty high praise! Will it live up to the hype?

Also this week: A new installment of Fan Fiction corner, involving a heartwarming coffee commercial from your childhood that may be ruined soon. Sorry!

As always, you can stream the episode right here on our site, or download the mp3 file. You can also find us in the iTunes store, or in just about any app you might use to listen to podcasts.

If you like the show, please consider subscribing to our Patreon, which helps offset our costs and allows us to keep doing the podcast each week. In exchange for $5, you’ll also get access to a monthly bonus episode, Book Fight After Dark, in which we discuss the wide world of romance novels.

Stream Episode 206:

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Episode 205: Mary H K Choi, “Korean Thanksgiving”

This is the second week of our special 2017 holiday mini-season, and we decided to do a second round of Thanksgiving, with an essay published in the online magazine Aeon. In the essay, Mary H K Choi talks about her family’s Thanksgiving tradition of eating in a cemetery to commune with their ancestors.

We talk about our expectations for essays, and how the term’s amorphousness can result in a lumping together of many different kinds of pieces, written for many different audiences and purposes. We also talk about authorial perspective, and how it may shift over time. Plus all our usual bullshit.

Speaking of our bullshit (and being back on it), we’ve got another installment of Fan Fiction Corner this week, featuring some heartwarming stories about the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Plus a final dive into the NaNoWriMo forums, where we try our best to help struggling writers with their pressing questions.

As always, you can stream the episode right here on our site, or download the mp3 file. You can also find us in the iTunes store, or in just about any app you might use to listen to podcasts.

If you like the show, please consider subscribing to our Patreon, which helps offset our costs and allows us to keep doing the podcast each week. In exchange for $5, you’ll also get access to a monthly bonus episode, Book Fight After Dark, in which we discuss the wide world of romance novels.

Stream Episode 205:

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Episode 204: Ann Beattie, “The Women of this World”

This year, listeners, we’ve decided to give you a mini-season themed around the holidays. We’re starting with Thanksgiving, and this Ann Beattie story, “The Women of this World,” first published in November 2000 in The New Yorker. Mike really loved Ann Beattie’s stories, back when he was in college and first taking creative writing classes, so he was curious to see if her work would still work on him in the same ways.

In the second half of the episode, we dive back into the NaNoWriMo forums, to see what kind of help this year’s crop of writers is looking for.

As always, you can stream the episode right here on our site, or download the mp3 file. You can also find us in the iTunes store, or in just about any app you might use to listen to podcasts.

If you like the show, you can subscribe to our Patreon, which helps offset our costs and allows us to keep doing the podcast each week. In exchange for $5, you’ll also get access to a monthly bonus episode, Book Fight After Dark, in which we discuss the wide world of romance novels.

Stream Episode 204:

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Episode 203: Tom Williams, Don’t Start Me Talkin’

This week we’re discussing our final novel of the Fall of Frauds, a book about two “authentic” bluesmen who turn out to be not quite what they seem. The music is real enough, but they’ve adopted the kinds of personas they assume their (mostly white) audiences want: uneducated, boozy, physically ailing black men from the deep south who speak in homespun slang, when they deign to speak at all. Don’t Start Me Talkin is Tom Willams’ second book, published in 2014 by Curbside Splendor.

Also this week: It’s November, which means it’s NaNoWriMo, which means it’s time for us to dive into the NaNoWriMo forums, where participants are looking for advice on everything from what to name their characters to how to depict the Wars of the Roses, but with talking rats.

As always, you can stream the episode right here on our site, or download the mp3 file. You can also find us in the iTunes store, or in just about any app you might use to listen to podcasts.

If you like the show, you can subscribe to our Patreon, which helps offset our costs and allows us to keep doing the podcast each week. In exchange for $5, you’ll also get access to a monthly bonus episode, Book Fight After Dark, in which we discuss the wide world of romance novels.

Stream Episode 203:

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Episode 202: Live from the Temple Library!

This week we’ve got something a bit different for you: a live episode we recorded recently at Temple University’s Paley Library. We were joined by local writers Jason Rekulak and p.e. garcia for a discussion of literary community, balancing the work of writing with the need to make a living, and pieces of advice we would’ve given to our college-aged selves. The format for this episode is a bit different than usual, since we were trying to make the program as useful as possible for an audience of college creative-writing students. But we think there’s plenty here that writers and editors of any age (and experience level) can enjoy, and learn from.

Jason is the author of the recently published novel The Impossible Fortress (Simon and Schuster). You can visit his website to play the game we talked about (briefly) during our discussion. Jason is also the head editor for Philadelphia’s Quirk Books.

p.e. garcia is a poet originally from Arkansas and now living in Philadelphia. You can learn more about them, and read some of their work, on their website. Philip is also an editor-at-large for The Rumpus.

As always, you can stream this week’s episode right here on our site, or download the mp3 file. You can also find us in the iTunes store, or in just about any app you might use to listen to podcasts.

If you like the show, you can subscribe to our Patreon, which helps offset our costs and allows us to keep doing the podcast each week. In exchange for $5, you’ll also get access to a monthly bonus episode, Book Fight After Dark, in which we discuss the wide world of romance novels.

Stream Episode 201:

Download Episode 202 (right-click, save-as)

Thanks for listening!